Crewmember Visa

Great news! Visa applicants can now present all application materials on the day of the scheduled interview! The consular drop-box at the U.S. Embassy has been closed, and visa applicants no longer need to drop off documents in advance of their appointments. We are always striving to improve our customer service to the people of Myanmar and hope that this change will improve your U.S. visa application experience. For more information: https://go.usa.gov/xPnDk

 

Crewmember (D) visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons working on board sea vessels or international airlines in the United States, providing services required for normal operation and intending to depart the United States on the same vessel or any other vessel within 29 days. If you travel to the United States to join the vessel you will work on, in addition to a crewmember (D) visa, you also need a transit (C-1) visa or a combination C-1/D visa.

Transit (C) visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons traveling in immediate and continuous transit through the United States en route to another country, with few exceptions. Immediate and continuous transit is defined as a reasonably expeditious departure of the traveler in the normal course of travel as the elements permit and assumes a prearranged itinerary without any unreasonable layover privileges. If the traveler seeks layover privileges for purposes other than for transit through the United States, such as to visit friends or engage in sightseeing, the traveler will have to qualify for the type of visa required for that purpose.

Note: The C-1 and D visas are issued separately for Burmese crewmembers.

For more information on crewmember visas please visit the Department of State website.

  • pilot or flight attendant on a commercial airplane
  • captain, engineer, or deckhand on a sea vessel
  • lifeguard, cook, waiter, beautician, or other service staff on a cruise ship
  • trainee on board a training vessel

Dry Dock, Fishing Vessels, Coasting Officer, private yacht, Outer Continental Shelf

  • A foreign citizen traveling to another country who will have a brief layover in the United States when the only reason for entering the United States is to transit.
  • A passenger embarking from a foreign port on a cruise ship or other vessel which is proceeding to another country, other than the United States, but during the course of the journey, the vessel makes port in the United States with no intention of landing in the United States.
  • A crewmember traveling to the United States as a passenger to join a ship or aircraft you will work on, providing services for operation. You will also need a crewmember D visa.
  • A foreign citizen proceeding in immediate and continuous transit through the United States to or from the United Nations Headquarters District, under provisions of the Headquarters agreement with the United Nations, requires a diplomatic transit (C-2) visa. Travel within the United States will be limited to the immediate New York City vicinity.
  • A foreign citizen whose layover in the United States is for a primary purpose other than to transit, for example to visit friends or sightsee, requires a visitor (B) visa.
  • A coasting officer seeking to enter the United States generally requires a visitor (B) visa. Coasting officers are employed temporarily when an officer of a foreign ship is granted home leave while the vessel is in U.S. ports, provided the vessel does not remain in U.S. waters for more than 29 days. The coasting officer may then repeat the process with another vessel of the same foreign line.
  • A crewmember on a private yacht sailing out of a foreign port which will be cruising in U.S. waters for more than 29 days is generally required to have a visitor (B) visa.
  • An officer or employee of a designated international organization assigned to the United States may pass in immediate and continuous transit through the United States on an International Organization (G-4) visa.